State Rundown 2/15: Tax Overhauls Debated Around the Country


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This week we are following a number of significant proposals being debated or introduced including reinstating the income tax in Alaska and eliminating the tax in West Virginia, establishing a regressive tax-cut trigger in Nebraska, restructuring the Illinois sales tax, moving New Mexico to a flat income tax and broader gross receipts tax, and updating gas taxes in Indiana and Tennessee.

-- Meg Wiehe, ITEP State Policy Director, @megwiehe 

  • Introduced last week, Alaska HB 115 would reinstate an income tax for the first time since 1980, setting the income tax rate at 15 percent of federal tax liability. It would also draw from the state’s Permanent Fund and change the structure of the yearly dividends provided to Alaskans.
  • West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice echoed the sentiment of the state’s Senate President, who is leading a select committee to examine taxes, to eliminate the state’s personal income tax. The governor said his goal is to “… be the eighth state in the country to have no income tax.” However, given the state has a revenue shortfall, the governor’s budget proposes to use spending cuts and tax increases to close the gap this year, potentially putting the income tax elimination plan on hold for now. Tax increases in his budget proposal include a sales tax increase and base broadening, a gasoline tax increase, and the creation of a commercial activities tax.
  • Nebraska lawmakers sent $137 million in budget cuts to the governor's desk in an effort to help close the state's $900 million budget gap. Also this week, the state's Revenue Committee will hear testimony on a trigger-based tax cut for wealthy Nebraskans that would worsen the budget gap in future years.
  • The latest tax plan out of the Illinois Senate would reduce the general sales tax rate from 6.25 percent to 5.75 percent while taxing food, drugs, and medical supplies at a higher rate and newly taxing services including repair and maintenance, laundry, landscaping, cable, and satellite.
  • Proposals to increase fuel taxes to better fund infrastructure improvement are dead in Idaho but still under consideration in Indiana and Tennessee. In Tennessee, variations on Gov. Haslam's attempt to combine the needed gas tax update with other tax cuts are proliferating, including one that would divert sales tax revenues from their intended purposes rather than update the gas tax, and a more responsible alternative that would update the gas tax and other fees without slashing other taxes.
  • Kansas revenue committees in both chambers are seeing their share of tax reform proposals. A House bill that increases income taxes, eliminates the LLC exemption, and restores itemized deductions for medical expenses advanced by a wide margin today, and could receive a final vote on Thursday. The latest in the Senate—eliminating the exemption for LLC income and restoring pre-Brownback standard and itemized deductions and a third income tax bracket at 6.45 percent--is expected to go to a vote to the full floor tomorrow.
  • A major tax bill has been introduced in the New Mexico House. House Bill 412 would restructure the state's gross receipts tax and proposes a flat personal income tax.
  • Despite higher energy prices, Wyoming’s economy remains flat while job and revenue growth continue to lag.
  • In Oklahoma, the House Appropriations and Budget Committee passed a bill that would increase the tax on a pack of cigarettes by $1.50/pack. The bill now heads to the full House for consideration.
  • Pennsylvania’s state supreme court refused to hear the Philadelphia soda tax appeal, arguing that the pending litigation is stopping the tax from funding programs it was created to fund.
  • An Arkansas bill to collect taxes from online retailers passed the Senate but stalled in House committee. However, Amazon will start collecting and remitting sales taxes in the state this March. A bill to require tax collections for online sales from large retailers is still under consideration in Idaho.
  • Another poll shows Iowa voters support paying more in sales taxes in exchange for investments in the state's water quality and parks system.
  • Efforts to help fill some of the state's $1.8 billion budget deficit with increased revenue contributions from corporations are underway in Oregon.
  • Nevada lawmakers heard a detailed presentation from an economic consultant explaining issues caused by the state's property tax cap that has held property taxes down but undermined funding for schools and other local services.

Budget Watch 

  • Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner will be delivering his third budget address today. The state has not had a regular budget since FY 2015 due to an ongoing impasse between the governor and a democratic majority legislature.
  • Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's budget proposal includes a proposed $600 million in additional tax cuts—including elimination of the state's property tax levy, reducing income tax rates, and restoring the EITC for families with one child. Senate leadership has suggested the more realistic target for tax cuts this session is $100 million.
  • Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy’s budget proposal, released last week, includes a mix of budget cuts, new revenue and shifts of state pension obligations onto municipalities. Elimination of the state’s property tax credit and a cut to the state EITC are among the new revenue sources.

Governors' State of the State Addresses 

  • In the past week, Governors Bevin of Kentucky, Sununu of New Hampshire, and Justice of West Virginia delivered their State of the State addresses.
  • There are no states with addresses scheduled through the end of next week.

What We're Reading...

  • A new paper out of the Wharton Business School looks at the relationship between "sin taxes" and consumer behavior, as well as ways to offset the more regressive impacts of these consumption taxes on low-income taxpayers.
  • A study on government pension funds shows combined costs for most jurisdictions appear manageable. Concern is for those outlier states with highest pension burdens—Illinois, New Jersey, Connecticut, Hawaii, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Delaware.
  • The West Virginia Center on Budget & Policy issued a brief showing that shifting from income taxes to sales taxes is a poor strategy for growing the state’s economy.

If you like what you are seeing in the Rundown (or even if you don't) please send any feedback or tips for future posts to Meg Wiehe at meg@itep.org. Click here to sign up to receive the Rundown via email.

Thank you for visiting Tax Justice Blog. CTJ and ITEP staff will soon retire this domain. But ITEP staff are still blogging! You can find the same level of insight and analysis and select Tax Justice Blog archives at our new blog, http://www.justtaxesblog.org/

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