State Rundown 9/9: Spin, Opinions and Tax Cuts


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Louisiana voters will consider ballot initiatives next month regarding road and bridge funding. The first measure would steer tax revenues from oil and gas from the state’s rainy day fund to its transportation fund. If approved, $21 million would shift from the rainy day fund to the state highway system in each of the next five years, with up to $100 million annually shifted to transportation thereafter. The second measure would establish a state transportation infrastructure bank, which would use public funds to offer loans and credit to public and private transportation projects. Of course, Louisiana’s legislators could also address the state’s $12 billion backlog in infrastructure needs by raising the state gas tax, which hasn’t changed in over 25 years or kept pace with inflation.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has changed his spin on the disastrous tax cuts he enacted two years ago, preferring now to focus on employment numbers instead of the promised revenue growth. When asked about his policies by a local reporter, Brownback replied, “The tax cuts were always designed around jobs and economic growth. Wasn’t designed around revenue for the state.” This, of course, is false – in 2012, Brownback and economist Art Laffer claimed tax cuts would increase revenue growth by 5 percent. And despite Brownback’s sunny job growth rhetoric, Kansas still lags the nation in that category. But what use are facts to a good story?

The Illinois budget might be a disaster at the moment, but one company will still get a tax cut. Amazon will receive a corporate tax credit for a new warehouse in Joliet, despite the fact that the corporate recruiting program was put on hold in June during the budget showdown. Economists have consistently questioned whether tax incentives matter to company relocation, and some Illinois legislators called for the decision to be reviewed. The state Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity says the tax credits were awarded to Amazon to honor a commitment made before the suspension of the corporate recruiting program, though some question that logic. Rep. Jack Franks asked, “"I'm not sure why we would provide tax credits to a company that's already made a decision to come here. If they've already said they're doing this, what benefit is there to the state?"

Tax reform proposals from conservative legislators in Georgia would make life’s necessities more expensive, according to an editorial in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Columnist Jay Bookman, citing ITEP data, argues that conservative plans to cut the income tax and replace the lost revenue by increasing sales taxes and applying the sales tax to groceries would result in higher taxes for middle and low-income families and tax breaks for corporations and wealthy individuals. Bookman also notes that the move could have a negative impact on the state’s bond rating if revenues don’t materialize as expected, and that families at the bottom of the income scale have already lost purchasing power.

Another editorial in The Toledo Blade argues that Ohio workers fare worse than others across the country, thanks in part to the misguided policies of current Gov. John Kasich. The column cites ITEP data to show that, under the governor’s new tax plan, the top one percent of Ohio taxpayers will receive an average cut of $17,600 while the bottom 20 percent will pay more. During his tenure Kasich also eliminated the estate tax, which provided revenue for local aid. With less aid from the state, poorer cities have struggled to get by or have been forced to raise local taxes on their already cash-strapped residents. 

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