State Rundown 3/9: Revenue Strikes Back


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Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker unveiled his budget last Wednesday, and while it calls for some distressing cuts to state services it also includes a worthy tax policy shift that would help working families. The governor wants to double the state’s Earned Income Tax Credit over three years. Currently, low-income families with three or more children can receive up to $937 under the credit; Baker’s proposal would increase this figure to $1,873. To pay for the EITC expansion, Gov. Baker would phase out the state’s film tax credit, which state reports have found to be inefficient and a waste of taxpayer money. One Department of Revenue report concluded that in 2012 the majority of credits went to just three movies, at a cost of $60.1 million. Attempts to curb the film credit by Baker’s predecessor Deval Patrick were unsuccessful.

Some Texas municipalities fear that state officials have pushed through too many tax cuts, according to a recent Bloomberg Business article. The disconnect, according to some political observers, arises from the popularity of conservative messages around taxation at the state level and the focus on providing services at the local level. While state spending has fallen – Texas is ranked 48th in per-capita spending according to the Kaiser Family Foundation – local governments have borrowed to pick up the slack. According to figures from the state government, local borrowing has increased by 75 percent since 2005 to fund public works necessary for managing economic and population growth.

A South Carolina lawmaker has a new plan that he says will raise an additional $800 million for roads and highways in the state. State Sen. Ray Cleary’s bill would increase the gas tax by 10 cents and index it to inflation, raise the sales tax cap on car purchases from $300 to $1,400, close some sales tax exemptions, and increase fees for licensing and registration. He estimates the changes will cost South Carolina drivers $65 more each year on average. Cleary’s plan would raise revenue, while a proposal offered by Gov. Nikki Haley would result in a net revenue loss. Haley called for an increase in the gas tax coupled with an income tax cut in her state of the state address earlier this year.

 

Following Up:
Pennsylvania: Gov. Tom Wolf’s budget proposal met mixed reviews from state editorial boards. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette though his budget was unrealistic and partisan, while The Philadelphia Inquirer called his plan ambitious and a necessary departure from his predecessors.

Mississippi: House Speaker Philip Gunn used a bizarre biblical analogy to assert that his plan to eliminate the state income tax would not lead to lost revenues. Opponents of his plan remain unconvinced.

Florida: House and Senate leaders appear to be on a collision course over balancing the state budget, jeopardizing Gov. Rick Scott’s proposals to cut taxes and increase education spending.

 

Things We Missed:
Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker released his budget last Wednesday – read it here.

Governors’ Budgets Released This Week:
Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (Thursday)

States That Will End Legislative Session This Week
Arkansas (Thursday)
Utah (Thursday)
West Virginia (Saturday)
Wyoming (Monday)

 

 

 

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