State Rundown 3/31: Tax Cut Throwbacks


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North Carolina lawmakers proposed another round of personal income tax cuts last week that cost more than  $1 billion when fully enacted and would slash millions of dollars in corporate income taxes. The Job Creation and Tax Relief Act of 2015 (a sure misnomer) would reduce the personal income tax rate to 5.5 percent by 2017 and replace the current standard deductions with  a zero percent tax bracket on the first $10,000 in income for single filers by the same year (married couples could apply the zero percent bracket to the first $20,000 in income). The bill would also reduce the corporate income tax rate to 3 percent by 2017 even if the state fails to meet the required revenue targets included in the 2013 tax cut bill along with several other changes. Revenues are $300 million below projections this fiscal year. Opponents of the cuts note that they would do little to stimulate the state’s economy while reducing public investments and providing a windfall for already-profitable corporations.

An elaborate tax proposal from Idaho House Majority Leader Rep. Mike Moyle would cut taxes for the top one percent of Idaho taxpayers by $5,000 according to an analysis by ITEP and the Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy. Moyle’s plan would increase the state’s excise tax on gasoline by 7 cents, remove the sales tax on groceries and eliminate the food tax credit. Combined, the elements of the bill will increase taxes paid by the bottom 20 percent by $68 and taxes on middle-income earners by $192.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley embarked on a statewide tour to drum up support for his proposed tax increases. The plan, which received a lukewarm reception from many state legislators, would increase the cigarette excise tax by 82 cent a pack, increase the sales tax rate on automobile purchases from 2 to 4 percent, and would end some tax credits for insurance companies, banks and corporations. The combined measures would raise $541 million in new revenue. The governor argues that his plan is necessary to end the dysfunctional nature of state budgeting.

The Nebraska Legislature will consider a bill that would increase the excise tax on gasoline by 6 cents. The increase would be phased in over four years (1.5 cents per year). Gov. Pete Ricketts opposes the increase in the gas tax, arguing that the state should look to other options for road construction that do not entail tax increases.

 

Things We Missed:
The Mississippi House defeated efforts to pass significant tax cuts this legislative session after Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves’s proposal to cut income and corporate franchise taxes by $555 million over 15 years died on the floor. Opponents of the cuts noted that they would sap K-12 and higher education budgets while shifting the burden of funding crucial services to the local level.

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed a package of gas and property tax increases that rank as the Utah’s largest revenue increase in 20 years. Proponents of the tax increases say they are necessary to fund important transportation projects and improvements in public education. The excise tax on gasoline will increase by 5 cents per gallon beginning in July, and will be indexed to inflation. It is expected to bring in $100 million for road and bridge repairs over the next two years. The property tax increase will add about $50 in taxes to the bill for a $250,000 house, and the revenues raised are earmarked for education.

 

States Ending Session This Week:
Kentucky (Monday)
South Dakota (Monday)
Idaho (Friday)

 

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