State Rundown 1/16: Kumbaya Caucus


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Newly-elected Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson continued a well-established tradition in the Natural State by beginning the legislative session with a proposed tax cut. Hutchinson’s plan would cut personal income tax rates by one percent for those making $21,000 to $75,000 a year, and would cost $137.8 million once fully implemented (according to Hutchinson's office). The governor has yet to outline how he will pay for his tax cut. His plan will offer virtually no relief to the 40 percent of Arkansans who make less than $22,600 and currently pay a percentage of their income in state in local taxes that is twice as high as that paid by the wealthiest Arkansans, according to the most recent edition of ITEP’s Who Pays report. Legislators predicted that the cuts would receive broad bipartisan support.

North Carolina lawmakers began their legislative session yesterday with the usual pledges of bipartisanship meant to muffle the sharpening of knives. The state’s Republican legislature could face a showdown with Gov. Pat McCrory over Medicaid expansion, a policy that the governor now says he is open to considering. At their traditional press conference, the leaders of the House and Senate reiterated their opposition to expanding Medicaid to cover 500,000 additional North Carolinians, but were non-committal on other issues likely to dominate the session – business incentives, teacher pay and local taxes, among others. Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger defended previously enacted corporate and personal income tax cuts, saying they are contributing to an improving economic environment despite revenue collections falling $190 million below state projections. This is after state projections were already adjusted downward by close to the same amount last year, so the state is actually bringing in $400 million less than originally anticipated.

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal urged lawmakers to find money to invest in the state’s transportation system, saying $1 billion was needed to simply maintain the current system. While the governor did not specify where the funding should from, he highlighted the inadequacy of the state’s gasoline excise tax, signaling his openness to a tax increase. Georgia’s excise tax has not increased since 1971, while fuel efficiency has almost doubled. The prospect of a transportation plan passing the legislature is dicey; Republicans are likely to oppose increasing taxes or fees, while Democrats could balk at a plan that doesn’t include funding for mass transit. Democrats enjoy leverage on the issue since their votes could be necessary to overcome Republican opposition.

 

Following Up:

Arizona – A judge ordered lawyers for the Legislature, governor and Arizona public schools to enter into settlement talks over a lawsuit brought by the schools against the state. Gov. Ducey previously called for a resolution in his State of the State address.

New Jersey – Gov. Chris Christie’s State of the State address received mixed reviews for being light on details (the governor did not mention his state’s transportation crisis and punted on unfunded pension liabilities) and targeted toward a national audience. Christie did, however offer dissonant platitudes about the need to make investments and also cut taxes. Perhaps next he will boldly declare his intention to rub his tummy and pat his head at the same time.

Nebraska – The Nebraska Cattlemen Association is monitoring the property tax cut proposals emerging in the legislature after Gov. Pete Rickett’s pledge to offer Nebraskans property tax relief in his State of the State address. They have shown particular interest in Sen. Al Davis’ plan to pay for property tax relief through new local income taxes.

Tennessee – As predicted, plenty of legislators hate Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to expand Medicaid coverage to 200,000 Tennesseans. House Republican leader Gerald McCormick is particularly unenthused, saying he would sponsor the governor’s bill but only because it’s his job (cue heavy sighing and eye-rolling).

 

Things We Missed: 

New Mexico’s Legislative Finance Committee and Gov. Susana Martinez both released their budget proposals this week. State revenues are expected to continue sliding due to falling oil prices, and less generous spending is expected. (Thanks to Ellen Pinnes for the tip!) 

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