Tax Cutting Mania: Iowa and Kansas


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The Iowa Fiscal Partnership has issued a policy brief about the destructive tax cuts that are being proposed in the state legislature. The cuts being debated carry a hefty price tag, $1.6 billion, most of which is from a proposal to cut income tax rates by 20 percent across the board.

As we’ve previously noted, these income tax cuts are very regressive. ITEP found that the wealthiest 1 percent of Iowans would receive an average of $6,822, while those in the bottom quintile would enjoy a break of just $18 on average.

According to IFP, the revenue picture in Iowa is improving and the budget can be balanced without drastic cuts to spending and without raising taxes. But it’s mind boggling that legislators would want to cut taxes as they're just barely crawling out of a fiscal crisis.

Charles Bruner, Executive Director of the Child and Family Policy Center, recently said, "Nobody is saying we're flush with revenues, but the picture has improved and we can get through without major cuts. But that assumes we don't dig a bigger hole with unnecessary and unwise cuts in revenues." For more on the tax cut proposals and why they are shortsighted, read IFP’s report.

In more disturbing tax cut news, the Kansas House has passed legislation that would link the state’s personal and corporate income tax rates to changes in revenue. If revenues increase, the rates for the state’s two major progressive taxes will decrease. Eventually the income tax could even be phased out altogether. 

Supporters of the legislation say that this proposal will increase the likelihood that businesses will locate in the state. But a more thoughtful critique was offered by two state Representatives in explaining their vote against the proposal. "When it (the income tax) is gone, our three-legged stool is cut to two — and the worst two we can choose. [The] sales tax is a regressive tax that impacts low-wage earners most.” The legislation now goes to the state Senate.

Thank you for visiting Tax Justice Blog. CTJ and ITEP staff will soon retire this domain. But ITEP staff are still blogging! You can find the same level of insight and analysis and select Tax Justice Blog archives at our new blog, http://www.justtaxesblog.org/

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