Yoga Lobby Tries to Block Tax Fairness Initiative


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ITEP, CTJ, and dozens if not hundreds of other organizations have argued for years that a well-designed sales tax should apply to nearly all retail sales, including both goods and services. We have shifted over the years from an economy in which most people sell goods to an economy in which most people sell services. Taxing only the sale of goods is an antiquated and inadequate approach for any state or local government to take.

So why don't all states with sales taxes expand them to apply to services? The answer has nothing to do with what's good policy and has everything to do with politics. Pretty much every business that provides a service can conjure up some argument as to why this particular service is vital to the health and happiness of the state's residents, and from there will argue that a tax (no matter how minimal) will destroy their ability to provide this service.

The most recent example comes from Washington, DC. The DC yoga lobby flexed their political muscle yesterday, urging yoga consumers (apparently known as yogis) across the District of Columbia to oppose expanding the District’s sales tax base to include yoga services and gym memberships.  The “DC Yogis Against the Yoga Tax” — which appears to be a coalition of yoga studios, teachers, and consumers — argues in their boilerplate letter to the Council that “most yogis and gym members are middle income-ers who've simply made it a priority to invest in their health and well-being.  The DC Council should reward their behavior, and encourage more people to take responsibility similarly for their own well-being.” 

Their plea then subtly attempts to downplay the revenue that could be gained by a tax on yoga, implying that such a tax would encourage people to abandon yoga, and therefore result in losses in productivity, self-reliance, and basic human functioning — all of which would adversely impact DC’s coffers.

If you live in the District of Columbia, we suggest that you write to your council member to tell them you support this tax proposal, which is essentially just an attempt to expand the base of the sales tax.

For more information, the DC Fair Budget coalition has additional details on the proposed sales tax base expansion, as well as on fiscal 2011 revenue options more broadly.  Also see the DC Fiscal Policy Institute’s take on sales tax base expansion, and on the recent outcry from the yoga community.

DC's yoga lobby is not unique. Maryland’s recent attempt to tax a handful of services met similar obstacles.  After proposing a list of perfectly sensible expansions of the sales tax base, industry lobbyists skillfully removed their clients from the list, one-by-one, until only the computer services industry remained (and of course, in time, the computer services industry was eventually able to avoid taxation as well). 

During all of this, the circling of the Annapolis capital building by lawn care trucks provided one of the most memorable and oft-cited examples of the influence that special-interests can have in a tax policy debate. 

For more on the importance of taxing services, be sure to read this recent op-ed by Sharon Parks of the Michigan League for Human Services.  In it she explains the history and merits of taxing services in Michigan, and advocates strongly for the proposal put forth by Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm to expand the state’s sales tax base to include a host of new services, and to return some of the revenue gained to Michiganders via a 0.5 percentage point decrease in the sales tax rate.

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