"Fair Tax" Dead in Missouri But May Rear Its Head in Kentucky or South Carolina


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It's safe to assume that there will be a special legislative session in Kentucky this summer. After all, the Blue Grass state is expected to face a billion dollar shortfall for the fiscal year starting July 1. Governor Beshear claims

he hasn't committed to calling back the legislature or decided what topic he would even select for a special session, but everyone knows a shortfall this large isn't going away without further action. So a flurry of proposals are being discussed from progressive income tax reform to increased gambling and even the so-called "fair tax."

The infamous "fair tax" legislation, which proponents are pushing all over the country, would eliminate corporate and individual income taxes, replace the lost revenue with increased sales taxes on a wide range of services, and eliminate most current sales tax exemptions. Before going too far down this path,

Kentucky legislators should take a moment to look at how that same proposal has faired in other states just this year.

Missouri, "fair tax" legislation passed the House of Representatives but went nowhere in the Senate. An ITEP analysis found that this proposal would raise taxes on middle-income Missourians and require a much higher sales tax rate than advertised.

A similar fate is expected in South Carolina where similar legislation has been introduced in the House. Advocates in South Carolina are hopeful that the legislation won't get very far.

Kentucky lawmakers should quickly jump off the failed "fair tax" bandwagon and instead look for ways to improve their state's tax structure while also increasing state revenue.

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