Making the News: Progressive Changes to Ohio, Minnesota, and Montana's Income Tax


| | Bookmark and Share

We've been lamenting for the past several years about the folly of Ohio's former Governor Bob Taft pushing through a phased-in 21 percent cut in income tax rates. Of course, the tax reductions made Ohio's overall tax structure less fair. Policy Matters Ohio recently released a report detailing the impact of the Taft tax cuts. Analysts there found that "key economic trends continued to go in the wrong direction after the tax overhaul." Despite this evidence, current Governor Ted Strickland has vowed to continue Taft's tax cutting legacy. But there is some hope brewing in the Buckeye state.

Representative Michael Skindell has called for freezing the phase-in of the Taft tax cuts for the wealthiest Ohioans. It's estimated that adopting Skindell's recommendation would bring in over $200 million and it's certainly a step toward making Ohio's income tax more progressive.

For tax justice advocates in Minnesota, it's a bleak time. Governor Tim Pawlenty is vehemently anti-tax, and his 21st Century Tax Reform Commission has largely followed his lead with recommendations to eliminate the state's corporate income tax and enact several investment tax credits, though in fairness the Commission does recommend two revenue raising options: expanding the sales tax base and increasing cigarette taxes. It's too bad that progressive revenue raising options weren't mentioned. It's hardly a surprise that some would like to see income tax cuts for the wealthiest Minnesotans preserved. But Wayne Cox at Minnesotans for Tax Justice argues against tax cuts in a recent commentary, correctly arguing that increasing the progressivity of Minnesota's tax structure would not harm the state's business climate. He warns that "the alternative is carrying out an even riskier plan that trims muscle, not fat."

There are more good proposals on improving the progressivity of state income taxes. Next we turn to Montana where Representative Dave McAlpin is trumpeting a "fix" to the state's 2003 major tax revision that reduced the top tax rate and bracket. State estimates were that the tax changes were supposed to cost $26 million a year, but in reality they actually cost the state $100 million. His legislation would introduce a new top income tax rate of 7.9 percent on Montanans with taxable incomes over $250,000, and help to right the wrongs of the 2003 revisions. If Rep. McAlpin's bill is adopted, the state could see $26 million in additional revenue and improve the progressivity of Montana's tax structure.

For more on the importance of progressive income taxes read ITEP's policy brief on this topic.

Thank you for visiting Tax Justice Blog. CTJ and ITEP staff will soon retire this domain. But ITEP staff are still blogging! You can find the same level of insight and analysis and select Tax Justice Blog archives at our new blog, http://www.justtaxesblog.org/

Sign Up for Email Digest

CTJ Social Media


ITEP Social Media


Categories