Gas Incentives to Use More Gas?


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Legislators at every level across the United States are trying to initiate gas incentive programs to combat the fuel crisis. About a month ago the automobile industry tossed its hat in the ring too. Sadly, however, GM did it in a way that directly contrasts the strides the country as a whole should be making to lessen its dependency on oil. As it is explained by the Associated Press, each month for one year GM will give customers who buy certain vehicles,
"A credit on a prepaid card based on their estimated fuel usage. Fuel usage will be calculated by the miles they drive, as recorded by OnStar, and the vehicle's fuel economy rating. GM will credit drivers the difference between the average price per gallon on their state and the $1.99 cap."
GM's official press release says that "this program gives consumers an opportunity to experience the highly fuel-efficient vehicles GM has to offer in the mid-size segment." You know, mid-sized vehicles such as the illustrious gas guzzlers Hummer H2 and H3, Chevy Tahoe and Suburban, and GMC Yukon.

Clearly, the incentive programs established in Florida and California by General Motors are not a step forward in our country's battle with oil and energy over-consumption. Instead, they are a very irresponsible step backward. Scientists, environmentalists, and individuals concerned with our country's overdependence on foreign oil are looking to alternative and renewable fuels and to pushing the national fuel economy higher. While recent incentive programs encompass a wide range of perspectives, most are at least willing to try something new, something that may one day be a key to solving the gas problem. Not so with GM. This recent gas program shows GM's true dedication: to selling expensive and inefficient models with no regard to social responsibility. The global sales leader in the automobile industry is digging in its heels to keep the status quo, and whether you look at it from the perspective of environment, pocketbook, or oil independence, it is a status quo that few Americans can afford.
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